Petition to legalized teacup pigs in your area

The city council members, state representatives, and Senators are responsible for giving permission to teacup pigs. If these cute pets are still not permitted in your area, you can convince them for their protection from neglect and cruelty. Not all pigs are bad and you can help in changing the agenda with respect to these pets. This is a concern for the pig owners to check the ordinances of their state before making the choice and then make their selection for bringing them home.

Personal Groundwork:

Before making an approach for the officials in your city council for advocating the legislation/ordinance amendments, the following points need to be well noted:

  • Get well informed about the issue to see the credibility and knowledge. It is feasible through the research and the contact with people who’ve considered the similar application.
  • Remain informed about the issues to get the right knowledge and make research for the relevant laws through the Internet or the local library.
  • Check out if anyone else is working on the same issue so that the present status of their application could be checked. The duplicated efforts are not worthy.
  • It is wise to attend an open council meeting for understanding the state laws and knowing how the ordinances work.
  • Getting information about the legislative process by contacting the county council office for information regarding the enacting information. The open council meetings can be attended to check out the functionality of these platforms.
  • Talk to the legislator’s staff to get their support. They are accessible and provide good information. Be thankful to them for their time and assistance.

Right education is necessary

Knowledge is the best arm to speak intelligently on behalf of the pigs. You need to be prepared with the facts and give an answer to every question being asked at the time of discussion. Inaccuracy in the collected facts or inclusion of vague statements would not help out in any way. Be clear, concise and accurate in your thoughts and do. Ordinances are meant for the general public and understanding them clearly would be very essential.

Get help from influential people

It is always good to have full knowledge about the things and presenting the necessary information to the council would be a wise way to move ahead. If there are any questions and you can’t find the appropriate way, it is feasible to ask for an extension or delay to respond in an informative manner. There are many pig resources which can help you in getting accurate information about them.

  • It is feasible to get endorsements from influential organizations or people in your community. The animal control officers or mayor could be contacted for getting the relevant assistance.
  • There should be researched and well-written factsheet prepared with the proposed terms for reformation consisting of the information about pigs. It could be addressing all the relevant data, inclusive of the myths and the general idea about them. There is a factsheet that could be included for the proposed reforms anticipated from the pig owners.
  • Hiring an advocate could be the most preferred way of leading your case. The constituents can draft letters to the legislators to give support for the proposed legislation. Personal letters do make an effect and are taken seriously by the higher authorities. Social media could be used to check out the similar interests of the people in amending the conventional ordinances.

Making contact with the authorities

There is nothing possible without making personal contact and requesting to make an amendment in the statewide bill. There are city council offices in every area. It is feasible to make direct contact with the councilman’s office and schedule an appointment. You can go alone or take the help of the community members in your area having similar thoughts. Appointing one person as a spokesperson would be advisable to proceed in the most respected way. You can go smoothly with the following important steps to follow:

  1. Professional presentation and confident outlook would make your first impression positive in the eyes of the state officers. Your group appearance or the solo visit should embark a positive action in the mind of the person standing opposite to you.
  2. You can give your identification as a pet lover, voter, entrepreneur, constituent, concerned citizen, or whatever appeals you the most in that way. Legislators always like to talk to the people who actually show concern for their state and talk in the most respected way. Voters are generally preferred for interaction.
  3. The points to be discussed should be supported by facts. You must give short and crispy information to explain the proposal as the public officials might not be able to give you too much time. They know a little about the issue and want to get the briefing of it. You need to explain how the proposed bill has a positive impact on the constituents. The information could be imparted by a written document or a video presentation.
  4. Be clear about your ideas and give a clear justification for sponsoring a bill or voting on the anti-animal amendment act. You will need all the support of the administrators to have the ordinance put in place for your pig protection.
  5. Publicize the issue and find additive support for your needs. It is advisable to drop an informational resource having a clear and concise summary of your proposal. Your letter/presentation or any other resource should clearly thank the councilman and support staff. Showing gratitude would always reveal positive results.

Your way of presenting the facts will matter the most and there are examples of many regions allowing teacup pigs as pets for home. However, there are still many unexplored areas where people wish to keep these cute pets at home but are unable to do so due to the state restrictions.

Laws to consider while having a teacup pig

There are rules set up for owning teacup pigs. There are some of the essential regulations to consider while making a decision to bring the pig home. The rules have to be followed to bring the teacup pigs home with authentication from city, pet and other laws associated with keeping the pigs. These are loving animals but should be brought home only after checking the state laws, travel laws and the other important laws associated with these pets.

  • Zone Laws: The regulations of every state in the US are different with regard to keeping the pets. You need to check the ordinances of your state to make sure that you get the pet with full cooperation from the state and the associated agencies. Many people initiate the conflicts for animals like teacup pigs to allow them to reside within the city limits. They have been successful in many cities for getting approval for home pigs. It is important to check the city rules before bringing the pig to the family. You can find many ways to check the pig zoning laws and file an application to amend the city ordinances. It is never good to bring a pet and keep them hiding from people if you’re not sure of the city rules. City ordinances are clearly mentioned and you can get into trouble by bringing the pig home without worrying about breaking the laws.
  • Travel laws: The laws for traveling of pets is different for every state. Some pets require blood tests and other visible identifications before crossing the state lines. There is a certification termed as CVI (Certificate of Veterinary Inspection) to follow for the pigs to keep at home. It is essential to make the pig travel with the legalized state certifications. These rules protect the pigs from the diseases which are contagious and the people not following these rules could be highly penalized.
  • Corporate laws: No pet can be neglected or tortured in any way. There are many organizations and animal control groups turning against animal cruelty. A large number of defendants are being protected by humane organizations all over the US. You need to be aware of the laws and procedures to follow to keep the animal at home. It is different to keep a farm animal and a household pet. Hence, all the laws must be made clear to the pet owners living in a house or apartment.

Personal injury law: Your pig might be decent but if it bites or harms anyone or any personal property, there could be legal complications for you. The pig has to be vaccinated against the diseases and trained properly to avoid any such problems. If your pig is not well trained, don’t take them to the community events as it might cause trouble for you. In case of rented accommodations, make sure that your landlord knows about your pet and if any problem is caused by it, you will get the damaged property repaired at your own expenses

Teacup pigs: Check the city ordinances before bringing them home

There are a number of pigs ready to get adopted across the United States. Some of the people blame city/zone restrictions and others don’t have sufficient research done on them. Many people are not aware of the rules in their city. Most recently, there was an application submitted for the city of Virginia Beach to consider the changes in the outdated ordinances having forbidden laws for keeping the mini pigs to be kept within the city limits. There was petitioning done in the surrounding areas of this city and the city council was requested to approve the tiny pigs to be kept in the house.

The USA has many cities and towns prohibiting the pigs from living within the city limits. In such areas, the pigs are considered as farm animals and not allowed in the respective city/town zones. Pigs live in homes all over the country with many cities having the restructured outdating zoning ordinances. Pigs could be pets at home and the owners have to mention the relevant reasons to the authorities to allow them within the city limits. Like other pets, there is a community for teacup pigs as well on social media platforms and general life. Each pig parent has the chance to ask the queries to get the right advice from the people who are experts in these pigs. It could be pig breeders, veterinary doctors, legal advisors or any other category of people having interest in talking about the issues of pigs.

There are many pig owners all over the world and the US comes in the worldwide region consisting of thousands of pigs happily living with their parents within the city zone. There are many cities/towns having ordinances for the city people for not to keep the pigs at home. Teacup pigs are certainly not livestock animals (raised for profit). These are a cleaner substitute for the dogs or cats to be kept at home as pets. The pet pigs are not as huge as the full-sized farm pigs and are not kept to make profits. These pigs are companions of their parents. You can’t describe them as livestock as they are not kept for growing and selling. The agricultural community has different standards described with regard to the animals.

The biggest example is that the pet food comes with taxes and livestock food is tax-free. This is a major point to be considered. The standards of agricultural/farm community are different. The size of potbellied pigs is huge in comparison to the micro pigs. Potbellied pigs are impossible to be kept and nurtured at home. Some people think that ‘mini-pigs’ is a deceiving term. The argument on the use of the term is quite prevalent in the cities/towns where the micro pigs are not allowed to be kept at home. There were ordinances placed before bringing the miniature pigs to the US. The towns having no ordinance with regard to the pigs have a generalized concept of these animals and there is a need to recheck the policies, so as to legally adopt the mini pig.

Pigs are pets too

Mini pigs are pets for many parents. They are not different than any other pet in your home. These pigs are very loving and come with a lot of love for their parents. Your decision for bringing them at home should be well-informed as it would be the case of bringing life to your home. Don’t forbid a pet that you are not familiar with as it could make you have the miserable condition. The allowance to plead the case and consideration of the amendment of ordinances is important to get the pig inside your city/town boundaries. The penalties are higher for the people who think about bringing the pigs home without thinking about the consequences.

Some facts about pigs

  • Pigs can be easily trained in the house and are the most lovable creatures.
  • They should be neutered/spayed to avoid any smell or unwanted aggressiveness in their behavior.
  • They are extremely intelligent creatures and become smart very soon. Their position is 4th on the list of smartest mammals on the earth.
  • Pig parents must get full education about them before bringing them home.
  • They need outdoor time and you must be aware that they need your attention when you’re at home. Ignored pigs become violent. It is essential to give some time to them or bring them in pair so that they get their company at home. Pigs are socially active animals.
  • The veterinary doctor should be allotted for every pig to keep them healthy and track their vaccination and body progress.
  • Pigs might be prey to some animals. Hence, if you are keeping them in the backyard or any open space, it is ideal to protect them with a fenced yard and protect them from the predators. Your pig is ultimately your own responsibility.
  • Many cities have compulsory vaccinations enlisted for the pets. There are vaccinations for pigs available and their vet would keep a track for the same. The pets need de-worming to keep healthy. There is no case of rabies in the pigs reported.
  • Pigs are prone to get obese and they get starved soon. Be mindful of this fact as you might make your pig huge if you don’t control their body. They will get into the category of ‘big pigs’ and cross the laws of your state of owning the small-sized pig. The restriction on the size of a pig by not giving them appropriate food consisting of the nutrients would cause an issue for their body. Hence, you need to give them proper pig food at a fixed time to avoid obesity issues in them. The pigs could be taken on a walk for getting rid of extra fat in the body.
  • Pigs don’t have fur on the body and they don’t stink. They have hair on the body and don’t sweat. The clear water sources should be made available for them to play or drink.
  • Micro pigs require their own space for rooting and play around. They need their personal bedding with a blanket to feel cozy. It is important to give them their personal space to keep them happy. It could be a corner of your house or apartment or a place in the backyard.
  • Training is mandatory for every pig. Your pig should interact with the general public in a well-behaved manner. You can give them food treat to pamper them and make them learn different things.

By abiding the basic rules of your state for keeping the pets, it would become easier for you to keep the teacup buddy at home. There are petitions made by owners in many states who are willing to bring the new family member home and considering the amendments in the outdated ordinance for allowing the teacup pigs to live within the city/county/town limits.

Restraining your Pig

In some areas of the country, and in other countries, it is sometimes difficult (if not impossible) to find a competent vet to care for your mini pig.

While you should NEVER stop looking for such a vet (our veterinary
pages are a good place to start), it is possible to do some of the routine
maintenance yourself.  This can reduce stress on the teacup pig, and on your pocketbook!

If your pig frequently walks on hard surfaces, hoof trimming might never be a necessity.  Otherwise, you
should plan on having to trim hooves at least once a year.  Details on this
process can be found on the Hoof Trimming page.  At the same time, tusks also might need to be trimmed,especially on male pigs.  Female pigs might never need their tusks trimmed, as they are normally much smaller.

Generally, for the safety of the pig, this is a two-person job.  Obstetric wire is the easiest and safest way to accomplish this task, and can be purchased on-line or at some feed or pet supply stores.  While cutting, squirt the area with water to prevent friction-induced heat from building up.  Trim tusks until they just barely protrude out of the mouth.  Smooth edges with a dremel tool or sandpaper if necessary.

If you have a young teacup pig, begin working with him/her NOW to acclimate them to having their hooves trimmed while laying down for a belly rub.  However, if you have a micro pig who is unwilling to tolerate hoof/tusk trims without being restrained, see the pictures below for some ideas on how to restrain your pig in order to perform this
important maintenance.


  In these pics, the pig is cornered, then gripped just behind the front legs.  The
person then sits down, with the pig between her legs.  A similar technique
is shown below.


 

With a pig that is fairly docile, it can simply be rolled onto its back while laying down.  It can
then be straddled between the legs as shown below.  (Notice that she is
wearing earphones – these critters can be noisy!)


Prevention and Maintenance

A preventive maintenance regimen can be achieved by using a pour-on topical, an oral, or an injectable preparation designed to kill both internal and external parasites. Pour-Ons work best on pigs with a fairly heavy hair coatsince the medication needs the hair shaft to penetrate in the body.
Frequent close examination of the pig’s skin and ears should inform you
of the presence or absence of mange. If no signs of mange are evident,
periodic treatment according to your veterinarian’s recommendations, can
keep your pig mange free.

Spring and fall seem to be the two most common times of year when mange mites are prevalent.

However, depending on climate and immediate environment, infestation can occur any time of the year. I have found the following protocols to be
effective. Ivomec Pour-On for Cattle and Ivomec Injection for Cattle and
Swine are ivermectin-based drugs. Ivomec is the Merial Ltd. registered
trademark for ivermectin.


Back to Treatment

Recent Adoptions

Below we are proud to show pigs that have
been adopted. If you have adopted a
rescue this past year or have a picture of one that has been adopted, please
feel free to e-mail it to us at PAPA@pigsaspets.org
so that we can post it for all to see and to rejoice that another piggie has
found a good home.

Remember that there are lots of abandoned
and orphaned pigs still needing homes, so we must push forward to see that new
homes are found. Remember, they don’t have to have been adopted from PAPA, just
adopted and not bought from a breeder. We know that not everyone needs or wants
a potbellied pig, so when any of us finds a good home for one, we need to share
in the joy.


This adorable
piglet (top pic) was a litter runt who had to be taken away from mom
because mom was so sick. He’s been raised indoors since he was one week old. 
He’s very sweet, and loves belly rubs!  The bottom picture is a
little female who was thrown over the fence of a sanctuary.  She
bonded with the little male piglet, and the decision was made to adopt
these two as a pair, since they’ve become so attached to one another.

We’re
happy to announce that both of these babies were recently adopted by Dana
in Indiana!


5/14/2001

This is Blossom. 
She was recently adopted by a nice family in southern Florida.  She
spends her days in the company of several friendly ducks and geese, lazing
about in the shade!  What a life!

5/21/2001

This is Althea, Spike and
Buttercup.  They were recently adopted by a nice family in southern Florida.  

7/3//2001

This is Salami.  He
was recently adopted by Mike and Leigh in Chatsworth, GA.  

7/9/2001

This is Chyna (in the
center).  She ended up at a sanctuary with several babies. 
Chyna was recently spayed and was adopted by Tracy in Talahassee,
FL.  Another happy ending!  

8/3/2001

This is Charlie. 
She was adopted by Dianne and her family in Napoleon, Ohio.  A recent
letter from Dianne is below:

“Hi Lana. Just wanted you to
know my Charlie is doing great. I will send you a picture. She is very
spoiled now . Terry is bringing her something home everytime he comes from
work. She loves her baths, at first she didn’t.  She seems to have
turned into Terry’s little girl. She heads for the door everytime he comes
home. She has her own room now and loves it. She gives a kiss everytime
she gets a mint.  She is just a sweetie we love her very much so
don’t worry about her. She is doing great I just wanted you to know. Take
care Dianne”

8/7/2001

This is Dean Martin and he was
found turned into animal control. He has been neutered and will be going
to his new forever home with Mary in East Central FL. He is about 5 yrs
old.

8/7/2001

This is Winnie, a little
female who was thrown over the fence of a sanctuary by some uncaring
person!  Luckily, Winnie sustained no major injuries during the
incident.  She is a real sweetie, and everyone who sees her just
falls in love with her.  Cathy from Ohio has adopted Winnie, and she
will be going to her new home very soon!

8/8/2001

These three cuties
recently found good homes!!

8/14/2001

There’s nothin’ cuter
than a pig playin’ in the dirt, don’t you agree?  This sweet girl,
Corbett’s Sherbet, recently found a great “forever” home with
Mary in East Central, FL, along with Dean Martin, who is listed above…

8/15/2001

These adorable boys and
girl found
a good home with the Pippins in McDonough, GA.  They have a new,
beautiful pen with lots of shade, and some nice grasses and weeds to
nibble on.  You might say they’re in HOG HEAVEN!

8/31/2001

This big girl was recently
adopted by Penny in Gainsville!


10/10/2001

This cute boy was adopted
by Janet in Pennsylvania!


10/24/2001

Here is the old
gentlemen pig, I picked up in Lake Mary/Sanford area.  He is a sweet
old pig.  I named him Eustis.  He is happy here, so he is going
to stay.  He is trying so hard to be liked it is really kind of sad
that he is fearful like my Wally that he will be dumped again.
He has his own quilt and none of the other pigs pick on him as he is
so big, skinny, but still big.  This is good so I don’t have to
worry about the piggies being mean to him.  Once he got his
quilt, he nestled right in and let out a great big sigh and went
right to sleep.  He checked out the yard, did his poops,
started to rain and he headed right in to his quilt.  Liked he had
lived here his all his life.  One of the pigs, Elmo came and
stared at him, but Eustis just ignored him and snuggled deeper into
his quilt and that was it.
He responds to his name already too.  Loves his peppermints and
tonight waited patiently while the “regular” pigs got there and sat
patiently on his quilt waiting for me to notice him.  I called out
and he immediately got up and walked over for his nightly treat
too.  Took it gently from my fingers, turned and walked to his
quilt, fluffed it up, laid down and crunched the peppermint then
closed his eyes to sleep.
It is uncanny, how at home he is here.  Out of all the pigs I have
rescued, none has ever displayed such behavior.  It is very
interesting to me.  — Nancy

1/2004

All information,
graphics, photos, and design elements used on this site, unless otherwise noted,
are property of Pigs As Pets Association and are
Copyright © 2001 by Pigs As Pets Association, Inc. All rights reserved.

Meet Dr. Tynes

Pseudorablies
Virus (Herpes Virus – Aujeszky’s Disease)

Edited by: John Carr BVSc DPM PhD MRCVS Swine Specialist –
Iowa State University
Lou Anne Wolfe DVM from Sapulpa, Oklahoma

Things I’ve learned about this virus and what every pig owner, rescue person and sanctuary owner should know. I’ve tried to keep this simple, but you can follow the links for more in-depth information at http://www.thepigsite.com

1.A pig can be a symptomatic carrier for an indefinite length of time, but end result is death.   

2. It travels so fast in some pigs that they die before it shows in the
blood, and only a brain serology test will confirm it.

3. It is a herpes virus and comes with a variety of symptoms. The presence
of other infections such as PRRS and leptospira may increase the severity of
the disease.  See http://www.thepigsite.com

Some common symptoms are:

A. Coughing, sneezing and nervous signs

B. Reproductive failure, abortions and mummified piglets (See http://www.thepigsite.com
for more information.).

4.Most states do not allow vaccination for pseudorabies. Once a pig is
vaccinated for pseudorabies, it will always test positive for the virus.
Vaccinated pigs can be differentiated from naturally affected pigs by routine
examination of the blood.

5. Can be spread to other animals including, but not limited to, cows,
goats, dogs, cats, raccoons and other wildlife.
Many hunting dogs get it from hunting and taking down wild feral pigs.
In cattle, pseudorabies is nicknamed “mad itch,” as it causes
frenzied scratching, intense excitement, paralysis, convulsions and death.

6. No pet potbellied pig has tested positive for pseudorabies in Florida,
but it has shown up in mixed herds, like those crossed with the wild ferals
for hunting camps, according to Dr. Maxwell at the Live Oak Diagnostic Lab in
Live Oak, Florida.  Would be wise
to check with your own state lab or state veterinarian.

7. No evidence of human infection.

8. Some causes and contributing factors to pseudorabies infection are:

A. Movement of teacup pigs

B.  Virus airborne – can travel for
at least a 2-mile radius

C. Infection from wild feral pigs

D. Mechanically–via people and contaminated vehicles

E.  Through infected semen via
artificial insemination or a carrier boar

F.   Within herds, it may be
spread by nose-to-nose contact, or by aerosol droplets. And periods of stress
may activate the disease.

These are only short notes. You should always check with your local or state vet for more information on pseudorabies in your state and area.

Pine Island

Oct. 2004

Around mid-September we received a call from a group in Pine Island who said they were moving the end of the month and had two pigs that they needed to place. I ask that they send me pictures and give me more information but it seems they could do neither. I did take her number and agree to put it on our Internet lists to see if anyone might be willing to help. I never heard back from them until Oct 1 st and then the gal said they were in the process of moving and if no home was found, they’d have no choice but to just turn them loose.  Needless to say this kind of talk doesn’t endear a person to me or any of our board members.  I suggested that the call Lee County Animal Services and either turn them over to them or have them humanely put down.  The gal got very upset and told me that she would rather turn them loose then see them dead.  I tried my best to explain that she wasn’t helping matters by not being willing to take some pictures so we could actually see them. Pictures speak a thousand words when you are trying to place them and I tried to explain that. I also told her that by just “turning them loose” was not ensuring them life but a horrible death at the mouth of any dogs around on the island.  Three days pass and then a very sweet gal by the name of Susan, called and said she was willing to help any way she could but needed some guidance.

I told Susan there was a place up in West Central Florida that might be able to take them but we didn’t know anything about them and she should check them out herself. She agreed and called the people and began trying to work on transportation as she had no truck nor carriers.  I put Susan in touch with Jenny who we work with locally from time to time and who probably had carriers and might even help with transportation.

On October 7 th I received a call from Jenny saying that she was going to help with this rescue. I told her that I might have a place closer and I could go with her and that way we would see first hand and check out the place. So on the morning of October 9 th , Jenny picked me up at 10 a.m. and off we went to Pine Island. There we were greeted by two very sweet pigs that really needed rescuing.

One black female named Gertrude (Gertie for short) and the white male Hamlet ( Hammie for short)  which is 1/2 pot and 1/2 Yorkshire. Has a straight tail, sway back and is only about 21 in at the shoulder and weighs less then 140# and is 4 1/2 yrs old. Rest looks like a Yorkshire and sounds like one. Loved him on sight. Gertrude was a small black female potbellied pig around the same age. Both starved for attention.

They had been living in a 4 X 4 pen with no shelter at all. They think they have died and went to hoggie haven with a pen with grass. The carriers that she took was to small to transport them in, so we had to borrow a large wire crate and we made a make shift a ramp out of old boards we found laying around and got the black one to walk up and into the large cage in the back of Jenny’s van. Hammie got loose but didn’t go far. In fact he sort of acted like he didn’t know where to go and so we soon had him back in his pen. The two ladies from the place and Jenny crammed him into a crate and we scooted it up the ramp and let him back out and into the wire cage. They were great on the trip and was happy to get out.

I wish you could have seen them when they touched grass. What a site to behold and I wanted pictures so bad and wouldn’t you know it. My camera quit working. I did manage to get pictures of them in Pine Island. They investigated ever little nook and cranny. Hammie finally laid down for a nap but Gertie kept exploring for a long time. Then she went over to Hammie and just nuzzled on him and up and down his back until he finally got up and went with her to explore other areas. The gal had fixed two buckets with water and had hung them on the fence for her farm hog to dump on himself and it took Hammie about 2 minutes to figure out how to do it.

The rescue that we rescued them from was not good to say the least but this gal that took them is another story. She really loves her pigs and other animals. She lives on a five acre farm and even has a 14 wk old calf in her front yard that follows her everywhere as does her farm hog who sleeps under her house. The pigs will have plenty of grazing area. Her little five acres backs up to a large farm with lots of cattle free roaming. She has joined our foster home team and I’m sure will be helping with rescues to come. We spent couple hours just sharing stories and getting to know each other. I think it is safe to say we will be going back. So two more piggies will sleep well tonight and a new piggy friend was made, so it was a great day.

Many thanks to all the people who made a difference in the lives of these pigs, either by on hands helping, locating places, funds for fencing and for those who gave lots of encouragement.  I love happy endings.

The photo’s above are Gertrude and Hamlet in their new home.

Adoption FAQs

SO
YOU WANT TO ADOPT
PUTTING FIRST THINGS FIRST

So you want to adopt a potbellied pig and you don’t know what to do first.
Please read through the following and then if you have any questions or want
to proceed with adopting, contact us at PAPA@pigsaspets.org.

1. 
Doesn’t matter if you live in a city or the country; live in a
house, apartment or condo.  You need to call your local zoning office or
code enforcement to find out if potbellied pigs are legal to have where you
live.  Get it in writing one way or the other.  If you rent, you
will need to check with your landlord and get permission in writing.

2. 
The
cost of adopting will vary, depending on where you live, who
you are adopting from and the age of the pet pig.  Usually, the adoption
fee starts at $50.00 and goes up from there.  Some are free if you
qualify as an approved home from some sanctuaries and rescue groups.

3. 
Are you willing to travel 2 to 3 hrs to pick one up or to pay
for transportation?  This can be an added cost.

4. 
For an inside/outside pig, do you have the proper fencing (like
a fenced backyard) to give him a secure place to be outside part of the day
and to go potty?  For an outside pig, do you have a pen with shelter set
up?  In very cold climates, pigs
need an insulted barn or shelter with lots of bedding in the winter. 
Also, a pool will be needed in the yard or pen for cooling off during the hot
months as they have no other way to cool down.

5. 
Have you located a veterinary that will see and treat the pig
should it become sick?  If not, we can help you locate one.  But
remember, it may entail driving for a couple hours to get to a good vet.

6. 
Does your whole family want the pig?  If not, the pig may
be in for a hard time and won’t be happy if mistreated by other family
members, no matter how much you love it.

7. 
Do you have small children and if so, are you willing to work on
integrating the pig into the family?  Like any animal with teeth, pigs
can and do bite.  Lots of people with children have pet pigs and are
willing to help you make the adjustment if needed.

8. 
Have you “pig” proofed your house as you would for a small
child?  With a potbellied pig, that is basically what you will have for
about 15 yrs.  Are you ready for a LONG TERM commitment?  Average
life span is between 9 and 14 years, with some living longer.

9. 
Have you researched and done your homework on what it entails to
live with a pet pig?  If not, go to the Internet and type in Potbellied Pig
and read from all the sites.  Lots of good information around on them and
the care they need.

10. 
Are you willing to join an email list where you can communicate
with other pig owners and get the help you need?

11. 
Are you open to a home visit from a pig owner to go over details
of owning?  Or can you supply us with a veterinary reference we can check
out?

12. 
Do you understand the pig mentality and the pecking order and how
to correct problems as they arise?

If you have answered all these questions and still want to adopt, then please
contact us. We will gladly work with you to find just the pig for your family.
If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us and we will answer any
questions and give you tips as needed.

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Copyright © 2001 by Pigs As Pets Association, Inc. All rights reserved.

Pigs in News

Oct. 2004

Around mid-September we received a call from a group in Pine Island who said they were moving the end of the month and had two pigs that they needed to place. I ask that they send me pictures and give me more information but it seems they could do neither. I did take her number and agree to put it on our Internet lists to see if anyone might be willing to help. I never heard back from them until Oct 1 st and then the gal said they were in the process of moving and if no home was found, they’d have no choice but to just turn them loose.  Needless to say this kind of talk doesn’t endear a person to me or any of our board members.  I suggested that the call Lee County Animal Services and either turn them over to them or have them humanely put down.  The gal got very upset and told me that she would rather turn them loose then see them dead.  I tried my best to explain that she wasn’t helping matters by not being willing to take some pictures so we could actually see them. Pictures speak a thousand words when you are trying to place them and I tried to explain that. I also told her that by just “turning them loose” was not ensuring them life but a horrible death at the mouth of any dogs around on the island.  Three days pass and then a very sweet gal by the name of Susan, called and said she was willing to help any way she could but needed some guidance.

I told Susan there was a place up in West Central Florida that might be able to take them but we didn’t know anything about them and she should check them out herself. She agreed and called the people and began trying to work on transportation as she had no truck nor carriers.  I put Susan in touch with Jenny who we work with locally from time to time and who probably had carriers and might even help with transportation.

On October 7 th I received a call from Jenny saying that she was going to help with this rescue. I told her that I might have a place closer and I could go with her and that way we would see first hand and check out the place. So on the morning of October 9 th , Jenny picked me up at 10 a.m. and off we went to Pine Island. There we were greeted by two very sweet pigs that really needed rescuing.

One black female named Gertrude (Gertie for short) and the white male Hamlet ( Hammie for short)  which is 1/2 pot and 1/2 Yorkshire. Has a straight tail, sway back and is only about 21 in at the shoulder and weighs less then 140# and is 4 1/2 yrs old. Rest looks like a Yorkshire and sounds like one. Loved him on sight. Gertrude was a small black female potbellied pig around the same age. Both starved for attention.

They had been living in a 4 X 4 pen with no shelter at all. They think they have died and went to hoggie haven with a pen with grass. The carriers that she took was to small to transport them in, so we had to borrow a large wire crate and we made a make shift a ramp out of old boards we found laying around and got the black one to walk up and into the large cage in the back of Jenny’s van. Hammie got loose but didn’t go far. In fact he sort of acted like he didn’t know where to go and so we soon had him back in his pen. The two ladies from the place and Jenny crammed him into a crate and we scooted it up the ramp and let him back out and into the wire cage. They were great on the trip and was happy to get out.

I wish you could have seen them when they touched grass. What a site to behold and I wanted pictures so bad and wouldn’t you know it. My camera quit working. I did manage to get pictures of them in Pine Island. They investigated ever little nook and cranny. Hammie finally laid down for a nap but Gertie kept exploring for a long time. Then she went over to Hammie and just nuzzled on him and up and down his back until he finally got up and went with her to explore other areas. The gal had fixed two buckets with water and had hung them on the fence for her farm hog to dump on himself and it took Hammie about 2 minutes to figure out how to do it.

The rescue that we rescued them from was not good to say the least but this gal that took them is another story. She really loves her pigs and other animals. She lives on a five acre farm and even has a 14 wk old calf in her front yard that follows her everywhere as does her farm hog who sleeps under her house. The pigs will have plenty of grazing area. Her little five acres backs up to a large farm with lots of cattle free roaming. She has joined our foster home team and I’m sure will be helping with rescues to come. We spent couple hours just sharing stories and getting to know each other. I think it is safe to say we will be going back. So two more piggies will sleep well tonight and a new piggy friend was made, so it was a great day.

Many thanks to all the people who made a difference in the lives of these pigs, either by on hands helping, locating places, funds for fencing and for those who gave lots of encouragement.  I love happy endings.

The photo’s above are Gertrude and Hamlet in their new home.